VIDEO: Officer Shoots Driver During Stop, Now Charged With Murder

UPDATE: Thursday, July 30th

10:10 a.m.

A University of Cincinnati police officer who shot a motorist after stopping him over a missing front license plate has pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and involuntary manslaughter.

Twenty-five-year-old Ray Tensing wore a striped jail uniform at his arraignment Thursday. Bond was set at $1 million.

Tensing was indicted Wednesday in the July 19 death of 43-year-old Samuel DuBose. Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters scoffed at Tensing’s claim that he was dragged by DuBose’s car, saying the officer “purposely killed him.”

Tensing’s attorney says his client feared for his life and didn’t intend to kill DuBose.

DuBose’s death comes amid months of national scrutiny of police dealings with African-Americans, especially those killed by officers. Tensing is white and DuBose is black. Authorities so far have not focused on race in the death.

Wednesday, July 29th

CINCINNATI — A University of Cincinnati officer who shot a motorist during a traffic stop over a missing front license plate has been indicted on murder charges, a prosecutor said Wednesday, adding that the officer “purposely killed him” and “should never have been a police officer.”

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters announced the grand jury indictment at a news conference to discuss developments in the investigation into the July 19 shooting of 43-year-old motorist Samuel DuBose by Officer Ray Tensing.

Authorities have said Tensing spotted a car driven by DuBose and missing the front license plate, which is required by Ohio law. They say Tensing stopped the car and a struggle ensued after DuBose refused to provide a driver’s license and get out of the car.

Tensing has said he was dragged by the car and forced to shoot at DuBose. He fired one shot, striking DuBose in the head.

But Deters dismissed Tensing’s claim that he was dragged by the car and suggested that he shouldn’t have pulled DuBose over to begin with.

“He fell backward after he shot (DuBose) in the head,” Deters said, adding that it was a “chicken crap” traffic stop.

A warrant was issued for Tensing’s arrest. CBS affiliate WKRC reported that the officer had surrendered.

Tensing’s attorney, Stewart Mathews, didn’t immediately return phone messages seeking comment after Deters’ announcement.

Mathews said earlier Wednesday that he thought an indictment was likely “given the political climate” and comments made by city officials. But Mathews said given the evidence he’s seen, he doesn’t believe there should be an indictment.

DuBose’s death comes amid months of national scrutiny of police dealings with African-Americans, especially those killed by officers. DuBose was black. Tensing is white. Authorities haven’t indicated whether race was a part of the investigation.

Body-camera video of the shooting was also released Wednesday.

DuBose’s family had been pressing for its release, and news organizations including The Associated Press had sued Deters to get it released under Ohio open records law, but Deters released it before any ruling had been made.

Audrey DuBose said that the body-cam video proved her son’s innocence.

“Seeing that video let me know that my son did absolutely nothing… nothing to provoke this man,” she said.

Deters called the shooting “senseless” and “asinine.”

“He purposely killed him,” Deters said. “He should never have been a police officer.”

Deters said when he saw the video of the shooting, he was shocked.

“I feel so sorry for this family and what they lost,” Deters said. “And I feel sorry for the community, too.”

The prosecutor also had sharp words for the University of Cincinnati Police Department as a whole.

“I don’t think a university should be in the policing business,” Deters said.

A message for comment was left Wednesday with the UC police department. The university said earlier this week it plans an independent review of its police department’s policies.

The UC officer made the traffic stop near the university’s main campus, and UC police have said the intersection was within the campus police’s jurisdiction.

The University of Cincinnati on Wednesday closed its main campus in anticipation of grand jury action in the case.

Mark O’Mara, attorney for DuBose’s family, called for a “peaceful and nonaggressive” response from the community after the officer’s indictment. O’Mara said the family wanted a peaceful reaction because “Sam was a peaceful person.”

Tensing has more than five years of experience in law enforcement and has worked as a University of Cincinnati police officer since April 2014, said Jason Goodrich, UC police chief. His annual performance review this April noted that he was extremely strong in the traffic area and maintains control of his weapons and of “situations he is involved in.”

Tensing formerly worked as an officer in the small Cincinnati suburban village of Greenhills

If convicted, Tensing could face up to life in prison.

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