California Company Recalling Cucumber After Salmonella Outbreak

Cucumber Recall Issued After Salmonella Outbreak

A California company is recalling its cucumbers after a salmonella outbreak. (Photo: CDC)

 

A California company is recalling its cucumbers after a salmonella outbreak that’s sickened 285 people in 27 states and killed a San Diego woman.

Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce of San Diego on Friday voluntarily recalled its “Limited Edition” brand garden cucumbers, which were grown in Mexico.

Health officials say the cukes are the likely cause of hundreds of illnesses since July 3 and the Aug. 17 death of a 99-year-old woman.

Half the people who became ill are under 18 years of age.

The cucumbers were distributed in Alaska; Arizona; Arkansas; California; Colorado; Florida; Idaho; Illinois; Kansas; Kentucky; Louisiana; Minnesota; Mississippi; Montana; Nevada; New Jersey; New Mexico; Oklahoma; Oregon; South Carolina; Texas, and Utah.

Previous salmonella outbreaks have been linked to products ranging from to chicken to chia powder.

To view the CDC’s information concerning the Salmonella outbreak read here. Here are some details about the outbreak:

  • Read the Recall & Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers   
  • CDC, multiple states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Poona infections.
  • Since July 3, 2015, 285 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Poona have been reported from 27 states.

o   53 ill people have been hospitalized, and one death has been reported from California.

o   54% of ill people are children younger than 18 years.

  • Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback investigations have identified imported cucumbers from Mexico and distributed by Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce as a likely source of the infections in this outbreak.

o   58 (73%) of 80 people interviewed reported eating cucumbers in the week before their illness began.

o   Eleven illness clusters have been identified in seven states. In all of these clusters, interviews found that cucumbers were a food item eaten in common by ill people.

o   The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency isolated Salmonella from cucumbers collected during a visit to the Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce facility.

  • On September 4, 2015, Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce voluntarily recalled all cucumbers sold under the “Limited Edition” brand label during the period from August 1, 2015 through September 3, 2015 because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.
    • The type of cucumber is often referred to as a “slicer” or “American” cucumber and is dark green in color. Typical length is 7 to 10 inches.
    • Pictures of the recalled products are available.
    • Limited Edition cucumbers were distributed in the states of Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah. Further distribution to other states may have occurred.
  • Consumers should not eat, restaurants should not serve, and retailers should not sell recalled cucumbers.

o   If you aren’t sure if your cucumbers were recalled, ask the place of purchase or your supplier. When in doubt, don’t eat, sell, or serve them and throw them out.

  • CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System laboratory is conducting antibiotic resistance testing on clinical isolates collected from ill people infected with the outbreak strains; results will be reported when they become available.
  • This investigation is ongoing. CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

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