Clemson Researchers Help In Mission To Mars

This undated photo provided by NASA and taken by an instrument aboard the agency's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows dark, narrow, 100 meter-long streaks on the surface of Mars that scientists believe were caused by flowing streams of salty water. Researchers said Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, that the latest observations strongly support the longtime theory that salt water in liquid form flows down certain Martian slopes each summer. (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona via AP)

Mars has been in the headlines this week after the discovery of water and the possibility of life there. NASA is also planning a mission to Mars to find out more about the planet.

Researchers at Clemson University are helping to make that trip possible. Professors from the school’s psychology department are interviewing astronauts and studying the side effects and communication challenges of such a long journey.

They’re looking at everything from the stress of the job to the boredom, and close quarters.

Marissa Shuffler says they’re working with NASA to make sure the crew will be as prepared as possible for this mission – and wherever else they go from here.

“Hopefully what we’re doing will not contribute to not just the Mars missions, but to missions much farther away,” Shuffler explained.

Nasa is planning its first-ever manned mission to Mars in 2030.

This undated photo provided by NASA and taken by an instrument aboard the agency's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows dark, narrow, 100 meter-long streaks on the surface of Mars that scientists believe were caused by flowing streams of salty water. Researchers said Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, that the latest observations strongly support the longtime theory that salt water in liquid form flows down certain Martian slopes each summer. (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona via AP)
This undated photo provided by NASA and taken by an instrument aboard the agency’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows dark, narrow, 100 meter-long streaks on the surface of Mars that scientists believe were caused by flowing streams of salty water. Researchers said Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, that the latest observations strongly support the longtime theory that salt water in liquid form flows down certain Martian slopes each summer. (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona via AP)

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