Hung Jury in Freddie Gray Trial of Officer

William Porter, right, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, arrives at a courthouse as jury deliberations continue in his trial, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Baltimore. Porter faces charges of manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office. (Algerina Perna/The Baltimore Sun via AP, Pool)

BALTIMORE (AP) — The latest on the trial of a Baltimore police officer who is charged with manslaughter in the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who was injured in the back of a police transport van (all times local).

3:15 p.m.

A Baltimore judge says there is a hung jury in the case of a police officer charged in the death of Freddie Gray.

Circuit Judge Barry Williams announced Wednesday that the jury couldn’t reach its decision after three days of deliberations in the manslaughter trial of William Porter.

He was the first of six officers to stand trial on charges stemming from Gray’s arrest and death. The judge told the jurors they had “clearly been diligent” before he dismissed them.

As the decision was announced a handful of protesters gathered outside the courthouse.

Gray died after suffering a broken neck in a police van while handcuffed and shackled. An autopsy concluded his head was probably slammed against inside the van as the van turned a corner or stopped.

Prosecutors say Porter should have called an ambulance when Gray indicated he needed medical help, and should have buckled Gray’s seat belt.

Porter testified Gray didn’t seem hurt. He says he told the driver and a supervisor Gray wanted to go to a hospital.

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2:35 p.m.

The jury weighing the fate of an officer charged in the death of Freddie Gray has indicated that it has a message for the judge.

The details of the message will be announced soon. Other jury notes have ranged from requests for transcripts to telling the judge the panel is deadlocked.

Jurors are in their third day of deliberations in the manslaughter trial of Officer William Porter.

After the jury indicates it has a note, it typically takes 10 to 20 minutes for lawyers and the defendant to assemble in the courtroom. The judge calls the parties to the bench for a quiet discussion and then reads the note aloud.

When the jury told the judge Tuesday that they were deadlocked, and he told them to keep working.

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2:10 p.m.

Jury notes in the Baltimore trial of a police officer charged in the death of Freddie Gray are causing a lot of courtroom commotion.

The panel’s request Wednesday for a transcript of witness testimony was at least the ninth note from jurors to Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams since deliberations began Monday. Williams denied the request.

On Tuesday, the jury told the judge they were deadlocked, but he told them to keep working.

He also has refused to give jurors transcripts of audio recordings, saying they are not evidence in the case. He has provided jurors paper, highlighters and an easel.

People in the courtroom first learn of such jury requests when a buzzer sounds. Then it takes 10 to 20 minutes for lawyers and the defendant to assemble in the courtroom. The judge calls them to the bench for a quiet discussion and then reads the note aloud and announces his decision.

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1:45 p.m.

As a jury deliberated in the trial of Officer William Porter, a handful of protesters are gathering outside the courthouse, chanting “send those killer cops to jail.”

Porter is facing manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office charges stemming from Freddie Gray’s death. He is the first of six officers to go on trial.

Prosecutors say Porter was criminally negligent for failing to buckle Gray into a seat belt and for not calling an ambulance when he indicated he needed medical aid.

Porter says Gray didn’t appear injured or in distress, and that it was the van driver’s responsibility to ensure prisoners were transported safely.

Gray died April 19, a week after his neck was broken in the back of a police van.

The jury is in its third day of deliberations. On Tuesday, they told the judge they were deadlocked, but he told them to keep deliberating.

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12 p.m.

Jurors deliberating the fate of an officer charged in the death of Freddie Gray have asked the judge for a copy of a transcript from a witness, but the judge has refused to give it to them.

The jury made the request Wednesday during the panel’s third day of deliberations in the trial of Officer William Porter, who faces manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct charges.

Jurors told the judge Tuesday afternoon that they were deadlocked, but Circuit Judge Barry Williams told them to keep working.

The jurors have made several requests since they began deliberating Monday. The judge has granted some of them and refused others, saying they were not part of the evidence.

It’s not clear exactly what witness transcript they were seeking Wednesday.

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